Srimannarayana Review

Rating: 1.50/5

Critic Rating: (1.50/5)

The future…

Books of history will celebrate the stories of how a whole race led a fulfilling life because they didn’t know better and didn’t want to, students of economics will debate the inbuilt fanaticism that disproves every theory of investment and critics will the site the Telugus as the first people to abandon story telling for something that is yet to be named (for now they are called family entertainers).

Why all this talk about the future? Srimannarayana (like most Bala Krishna experiences) has the potential to be a landmark example contributing to these debates of the future.


Srimannarayana aka Sriman (Bala Krishna) is this sensational journalist known for his sensational work in breaking out scams (anything short of sensational doesn’t agree with the cult). And there’s Parvati Melton playing a journalist from a rival
news channel.

Starts off with how the township grant for ex-military people had been scammed by the educational minister. Melton shows up at the empty township land and starts shooting random stuff to expose the scam and who is competing to be the dumber journalist, a girl from Sriman’s office shooting randomly on his orders.Melton snitches on her to the scammers and we have people in SUVs chasing this girl who’s on a two wheeler and is in a video chat with Sriman, upon Sriman’s suggestion of course. Using the video chat, some GPS and his usual sleek manner Bala Krishna once again earns his right to mouth randomly rhyming lines and trash goons with the physical power he so obviously symbolizes.

The next scam that comes Sriman’s way is when a group of bureaucrats scam Sriman’s dad who collects 5000 crores for a famer welfare scheme. And they even scam to make Sriman the culprit. How Sriman eliminates the villains wearing random historical costumes is the rest.

Confusion will soon disappear

Our films have come up with a pattern wherein a lot can be spent without achieving the most minimal of standards; and not that our bar on any standards is that high, but, right now we are somewhere between appalling and confusing, and the confusion about the presence of a story will soon disappear.


To manage to sit through BK’s films, one should purchase enough from the canteen or should practice observing the architecture of theaters.


A demeaning experience.

Reviewed by Rohit

Give your rating:

We would like to hear your comments below: